Fallen arches is a condition that is termed posterior tibial tendon dysfunction, or PTTD. It also may be referred to as adult-acquired flat feet. Many people with flat feet suffer little or no problems. But others may experience pain if a tendon in the arch of the foot becomes inflamed, overstretched, or torn. The problem starts with the posterior tibial tendon, which begins in the leg, runs through the ankle, and connects to the bones in the bottom of the foot. When it is damaged, it can result in flat feet. This type of occurrence is far more prevalent in women, especially those between 40 and 60 years old. It is believed to be the result of overuse of the posterior tibial tendon. It is also common among runners and athletes who play high-impact sports. Other causes include diabetes, obesity, and high blood pressure. Symptoms include pain on the inside of the foot and ankle, accompanied by swelling, redness, and warmth. Symptoms usually spike after engaging in physical activity, such as jumping and running. For more information on this type of injury, it is suggested that you make an appointment with a podiatrist.

Flatfoot is a condition many people suffer from. If you have flat feet, contact Alex Yanovskiy, DPM from Illinois Foot & Ankle Clinic. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What Are Flat Feet?

Flatfoot is a condition in which the arch of the foot is depressed and the sole of the foot is almost completely in contact with the ground. About 20-30% of the population generally has flat feet because their arches never formed during growth.

Conditions & Problems:

Having flat feet makes it difficult to run or walk because of the stress placed on the ankles.

Alignment – The general alignment of your legs can be disrupted, because the ankles move inward which can cause major discomfort.

Knees – If you have complications with your knees, flat feet can be a contributor to arthritis in that area.  

Symptoms

  • Pain around the heel or arch area
  • Trouble standing on the tip toe
  • Swelling around the inside of the ankle
  • Flat look to one or both feet
  • Having your shoes feel uneven when worn

Treatment

If you are experiencing pain and stress on the foot you may weaken the posterior tibial tendon, which runs around the inside of the ankle. 

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Des Plaines , IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Flatfoot

Flatfoot is a foot disorder that is not as straightforward as many people believe.  Various types of flatfoot exist, each with their own varying deformities and symptoms.  The partial or total collapse of the arch, however, is a characteristic common to all types of flatfoot.  Other signs of flatfoot include:

  • “Toe drift,” or the pointing outward of the toes and the front part of the foot
  • The tilting outward of the heel and the tilting inward of the ankle
  • The lifting of the heel off the ground earlier when walking due to a tight Achilles tendon
  • Hammertoes
  • Bunions

One of the most common types of flatfoot is flexible flatfoot.  This variation usually starts in childhood and progresses as one ages into adulthood.  Flexible flatfoot presents as a foot that is flat when standing, or weight-bearing.  When not standing, the arch returns.  Symptoms of flexible flatfoot include:

  • Pain located in the heel, arch, ankle, or along the outside of the foot
  • Overpronation, or an ankle that rolls in
  • Shin splint, or pain along the shin bone
  • General foot aches or fatigue
  • Pain located in the lower back, hip, or knee

Your podiatrist will most likely diagnose flatfoot by examining your feet when you stand and sit.  X-rays may be taken to define the severity and help determine the treatment option best for your condition.  Nonsurgical treatments can include activity modification, weight loss, orthotics, immobilization, medications, physical therapy, shoe modifications, and ankle foot orthoses (AFO) devices.  If nonsurgical methods prove ineffective, surgery may be considered.  Multiple surgical procedures can correct flatfoot; and depending on your specific condition, one may be selected alone or combined with other techniques to ensure optimal results.

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1400 East Golf Rd, Unit 201, Des Plaines, IL 60016

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