There is no mistaking a bunion. It is easily noticed by the hard bump that forms on the side of the big toe. It is considered to be a deformity and can happen from wearing shoes that do not have adequate room in the toe area. It may also occur for genetic reasons or as a result of an abnormal foot structure. If the bunion is severe, it may force the other toes to shift away from the big toe and toward each other, possibly causing the need for wider shoes to be purchased. Corns and calluses may form on top of the toes where they meet the shoe, and there may be a reduced range of motion in the big toe. Mild relief may be found when a protective pad is worn over the bunion and larger shoes are worn. Some patients will have their podiatrist tape their foot into a normal position, and this may be helpful in eliminating any existing pressure. Surgery may be considered for permanent removal, and this type of treatment may be chosen if the bunion interferes with completing daily activities. If you have developed a bunion, it is suggested that you consult with a podiatrist who can help you with the treatment option that is best for you.

If you are suffering from bunion pain, contact Alex Yanovskiy, DPM of Illinois Foot & Ankle Clinic. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is a Bunion?

Bunions are painful bony bumps that usually develop on the inside of the foot at the joint of the big toe. As the deformity increases over time, it may become painful to walk and wear shoes. Women are more likely to exacerbate existing bunions since they often wear tight, narrow shoes that shift their toes together. Bunion pain can be relieved by wearing wider shoes with enough room for the toes.

Causes

  • Genetics – some people inherit feet that are more prone to bunion development
  • Inflammatory Conditions - rheumatoid arthritis and polio may cause bunion development

Symptoms

  • Redness and inflammation
  • Pain and tenderness
  • Callus or corns on the bump
  • Restricted motion in the big toe

In order to diagnose your bunion, your podiatrist may ask about your medical history, symptoms, and general health. Your doctor might also order an x-ray to take a closer look at your feet. Nonsurgical treatment options include orthotics, padding, icing, changes in footwear, and medication. If nonsurgical treatments don’t alleviate your bunion pain, surgery may be necessary.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Des Plaines , IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Bunions

A bunion is a bump that forms at the base of the big toe. Bunions form when the big toe pushes against the next toe, which forces the big toe joint to get bigger and stick out.  As a result, the skin over the bunion may start to appear red and it may feel sore.

There are risk factors that can increase your chances of developing bunions. People who wear high heels or ill-fitting shoes are more likely to develop them, in addition to those who have a genetic history of bunions or have rheumatoid arthritis.

The most obvious way to tell if you have a bunion is to look for the big toe pushing up against the toe next to it. Bunions produce a large protrusion at the base of the big toe and may or may not cause pain. Other symptoms are redness, swelling, and restricted movement of the big toe if you have arthritis. 

Nonsurgical methods are frequently used to treat bunions that aren’t severe. Some methods of nonsurgical treatment are orthotics, icing and resting the foot, taping the foot, and pain medication. Surgery is usually only required in extreme cases. However, if surgery is needed, some procedures may involve removing the swollen tissue from around the big toe joint, straightening the big toe by removing part of the bone, or joining the bones of your affected joint permanently.

Your podiatrist will diagnose your bunion by doing a thorough examination of your foot. He or she may also conduct an x-ray to determine the cause of the bunion and its severity.

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1400 East Golf Rd, Unit 201, Des Plaines, IL 60016

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