Corns can develop on many parts of the feet, although certain areas are more prone to corn formation due to increased pressure, friction, or rubbing against footwear. One common location for corns is on the tops of the toes, particularly over joints where the toe bones meet. The pressure from shoes that are too tight or narrow can cause friction in these areas. Similarly, corns may form on the sides of the toes, where adjacent toes rub against each other or against the sides of shoes. On the soles of the feet, corns often occur over bony prominences, such as the balls of the feet or the heels. Excessive pressure from walking or standing can cause thickened areas of skin to develop. Soft corns can also form between the toes due to moisture accumulation and friction. If you have corns on your feet, it is suggested you consult with a podiatrist who can provide more information about effective treatment and prevention. 

If you have any concerns regarding your feet and ankles, contact Alex Yanovskiy, DPM of Illinois Foot & Ankle Clinic. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Corns: What Are They? and How Do You Get Rid of Them?

Corns can be described as areas of the skin that have thickened to the point of becoming painful or irritating. They are often layers and layers of the skin that have become dry and rough, and are normally smaller than calluses.

Ways to Prevent Corns

There are many ways to get rid of painful corns such as wearing:

  • Well-fitting socks
  • Comfortable shoes that are not tight around your foot
  • Shoes that offer support

Treating Corns

Treatment of corns involves removing the dead skin that has built up in the specific area of the foot. Consult with Our doctor to determine the best treatment option for your case of corns.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Des Plaines , IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Everything You Need to Know About Corns

Corns are hard and thick areas of skin that form as a result of constant rubbing, friction, or pressure on the skin. They are patches of dead skin with a small plug toward the center. They may appear on the tops and sides of toes and can make walking painful.

Soft corns are typically thinner with a white color and rubbery texture. Soft corns tend to appear between the toes. Seed corns are another type of corn that appear in clusters and can be tender if they are on a weight-bearing part of the foot. Seed corns usually appear on the bottom of the foot and are likely caused by a blockage in sweat ducts.

While corns and calluses are somewhat similar, calluses are a bit different. Calluses are a patch of dead skin that can occur anywhere on the body. In comparison to corns, calluses are usually a bit larger in size. However, both corns and calluses are caused by increased friction on the skin.

There are some risk factors that may increase your chances of developing corns and calluses. If you have bunions, hammertoe, or a bone spur, you are more likely to develop a corn or callus on your foot.

While Corns and Calluses tend to disappear when the friction to the affected area ceases, the help of a podiatrist may be useful in the removal process. It is important to remove the dead skin around the area and this may be done in a few different ways. Moisturizing creams may be helpful in softening and removing the dead skin around the callus. You should never use razors or other pedicure equipment to remove your corns. Doing this may worsen your corn or callus and cause infection. 

In some cases, corns and calluses may be caused by abnormal foot structure or walking motion. In such a case, you should seek a podiatrist’s assistance in order to correct the issue.

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1400 East Golf Rd, Unit 201, Des Plaines, IL 60016

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